Dr Ross Lamplugh

Dr Ross Lamplugh
Doctor, Restaurateur, Entrepreneur, Innovator.

I grew up in the outer suburbs of Melbourne.

In Grade six the teacher was going around the room and asking all the kids what they wanted to be when they grow up.

I don’t know why, or where it came from, but I instinctively said I wanted to be a doctor.

Everyone in the class burst out laughing including the teacher.

(Ross now owns 31 individual Medical Centers around the country employing over 200 Doctors)

Steve Trice

Steve Trice
Growing up poor, Finding Opportunities, Facing Fear and Hard Graft.

The customer is the be all and end all and that is it. The customer, the customer, the customer.

If they’re not getting what they wanted, if they're not getting success out of what we do. we’ve failed.

It’s not about me, we just happen to have a portfolio, a smorgasbord of things that we can give and we match our product to the customer and if the customer gets a big tick in a box, well.

There’s nothing I used to love more when I was knackered, really tired, flown overseas, come back and someone rings me up and says “you know that thing? well, we’ve been audited we’ve got no non-compliance’s! Fantastic! it’s never happened before!” that makes me happy.

It wasn’t about the fact that you charged him $50,000, that wasn’t the issue, the issue was about the fact that they had had a massive win
Understanding the customers and their culture and improving their culture by giving them tools to do it that was really what it was all about.

Steve Trice

Steve Trice
Growing up poor, Finding Opportunities, Facing Fear and Hard Graft.

I'm a great admirer of Richard Branson.

He is a brilliant example of somebody who isn’t afraid to take risks, he always calculates what the risks are and he’s always been successful. He’s an absolutely enthusiast for whatever business he’s associated with and I love that I think it’s brilliant it’s a good recipe for success.

That, and he's got big balls!

Steve Trice

Steve Trice
Growing up poor, Finding Opportunities, Facing Fear and Hard Graft.

The biggest challenge in business for me was the fear of failure. It is a big one.

How do you overcome it? By persevering.

To fail was not on the agenda, it’s not in my bible for business. I know it’s a fact of life in business, but it’s not in MY bible. If you think you might fail, what you do is you put in more effort.

Monday morning at 7 o’clock I was on the road, I lived in a 1 bedroom room student hostel for 18 months, 5 days a week and I used to go home on Friday afternoon.

I only saw my family at the weekend, but I knew that was my one big chance to make the business work.

I was not going back.

Patricia Bromley-Marks

Patricia Bromley-Marks,
Model, Film Producer, Gourmet Butcher, Jeweller and much more.

I think my biggest mistake was not taking enough time off. Not allocating time for us as a family.

We started off in business, just Richard and myself with a producer, and obviously we had to work all hours that god sent to make that work.

As we employed more and more people we should really of taken a bit more time off for our health.

Health plays a big part in working hard and I think both of us ran ourselves into the ground on occasions, that was a mistake.

Patricia Bromley-Marks

Patricia Bromley-Marks,
Model, Film Producer, Gourmet Butcher, Jeweller and much more.

In the film industry we were pretty smart because we decided to retire early! It was exactly at the time when the technology was changing.

We were still using 35mm film, the old fashioned way of doing things. We are pleased that we retired when we did, we weren’t confronted with the emerging technology problem.

In my jewellery business I again haven’t dragged myself into the new way of CAD design, I’m interested but I just feel I will continue on with what I’m doing, the old fashioned way, picking up a saw and a hammer and smelting things down myself.

That way I can make my products genuinely bespoke and hand made.

Patricia Bromley-Marks

Patricia Bromley-Marks,
Model, Film Producer, Gourmet Butcher, Jeweller and much more.

Happiness in my various business was an on going theme. People liked to work with and for me.

I think I was a good boss. I try to lead by example.

In the Butcher shop for instance, the absolute worst job in the shop was getting the fresh thyme off the sprig ready for the sausage mix. It was time consuming and hard on you're hands.

So, that was my job

Sperry Gruppetta

Sperry Gruppetta- Immigrant, Musician, Drop-out, Millionaire.

I went to Melbourne Uni.

A European father always wants his son to be a doctor orlawyer or an accountant.

I went to one of the best Uni’s in Melbourne and I hated it. I hardly ever attended any classes.

I was too busy playing in a Rock and Roll band, chasing women and getting drunk. I knew how to make money, that was a no brainer, it was a waste of time for me and a waste of my father’s money.

In the end I had to fess up to him and say, I just don’t want to do this anymore, I’ve got more important things to do in my life like make money, so I bailed out.

Sperry Gruppetta

Sperry Gruppetta- Immigrant, Musician, Drop-out, Millionaire.

My late (business) partner and I were like a married couple, we fought a lot, but, I trusted everything he ever said.

He was a stickler for doing cash flows and worrying about tomorrow. I never really worried. I was more of a entrepreneur not a financier, he was the guy that counted the beans.

I brought home the bacon and let him cook it.

He used to preach to me, “you’ve also got to be a conservative with your money, be very very conservative with your money”. I didn’t listen because he was there as backup.

It’s only when he died, that all of a sudden I thought, he’s totally right, I had no idea, I had no concept of what to actually do because he had always cradled me through.

Sperry Gruppetta

Sperry Gruppetta- Immigrant, Musician, Drop-out, Millionaire.

I didn’t start out in business to make money.

After being a musician for so many years, I never had a job, I never worked for anybody. I was just a musician. When that life was over I started a little business. I just did it to make a living, but, I wanted to be the best.

I was broke for a long time. My ex-wife kept me for years and years. I was drawing $50 a week and really I was flying by the seat of my pants.

I understood what musicians wanted but everybody kept saying that it was impossible.

The big bucks and success came from many years of hard work and having good people around me.

Neil Broomfield

Neil Broomfield- Monsanto, Swiss paint, Bulletproof Glass and Door Knobs

I wouldn’t prescribe any particular book courses to anyone.

I’m not sure that an MBA would have ever served me any purpose and I’m not entirely convinced that it serves anybody any purpose, except for the next person their going to employee should have an MBA as well

I don’t believe in stuff like that, I believe in common sense and drive.

Drive to do it yourself, or to recognise you can’t do it yourself and to seek the right help.

Without that, I don’t think you should try and set up on your own, you're probably better of working for someone else..

Neil Broomfield

Neil Broomfield- Monsanto, Swiss paint, Bulletproof Glass and Door Knobs

I recognized that working in big companies was not for me.

I wanted to strike out on my own, forge my own way. I didn't want to be answerable to people I either didn’t respect or I didn’t like working with.

People who’s opinions, I would say, are wrong, or just didn’t coincide with mine.

So really, it was freedom I wanted.

Neil Broomfield

Neil Broomfield- Monsanto, Swiss paint, Bulletproof Glass and Door Knobs

Landing the bullet resistant glass contract in Hong Kong was the most off the wall, unexpected and potentially profitable thing that ever happened.

The excitement, the rush, all of that. I loved developing the particular specification, as required by the contract, for the glass to resist an AK47 bullet. That part was a real challenge, getting the glass configuration right and having it tested to the satisfaction of the Royal Hong Kong Police.

I loved it.

Polly Venning

Polly Venning, Corporate High Flyer turned Serial Entrepreneur.

The hardest decision I've had to make, was to shut down, actually close a business. This was a business I was very passionate about.

On the outside it looked extremely successful and very professional, but I was losing sleep at night because the finances just aren’t coming in the door.

There’s a lot of ego’s involved, obviously. There’s that feeling that you’ve let people down.

Being aware of all of that, taking it all on board, working through it and saying well, fundamentally, at the end of the day, what am I here for?

Letting that business go and deciding to start something new, it’s a tough gig.

Working for yourself is a very tough gig.

Polly Venning

Polly Venning, Corporate High Flyer turned Serial Entrepreneur.

The thing I would change is, I would not pay attention to the nay sayers that surrounded me as a teenager. I would of found a way to go to university. I would of studied law.

I grew up in a farming community so education for girls was not considered a priority, university was not even an option.

Now, I sit on quite a few boards and I’m a brand ambassador for Magdalene College in Cambridge, so I’ve certainly had lots and lots of fabulous opportunities that I wouldn’t trade for the world.

Dick Marks OAM

Dick Marks OAM, Film Director, Production Company owner.

"Polaroid cameras had just come out. I’m 13 or 14 years old and I wanted to make money. So I thought I’d buy one of these cameras and photograph people at the intermission during the movies on Saturday Night.

I’ll photograph the girls and they can get their photograph straight away and I’ll charge them $1 a head, I made really good money.

Saturday night at the movies, 9 o’clock you’d walk around to the Bellview café and the girls were all done up and the guys were all hanging out. It was an interesting scene. Everyone was in the milk bar. I’d just go around and take photographs with the Polaroid. The magic of this thing! The image coming up straight away!

I would sell as many as I could take. I wanted to be independent. "

Dick Mark OAM

Dick Marks OAM, Film Director, Production Company owner.

"My biggest challenge was my health. Making sure I got up every morning, before dawn and just keeping it together.

It’s a very difficult thing to do day in day out, 16 hours a day was kind of normal. We would shoot at dawn then you have breakfast then work through till about 10 at night. After that you may look at rushes from the day before.

It’s enormously challenging physically, I mean, we went 13 years without a holiday, or a break.

From the first moment I went onto a (film) set that was it for me, I was going to do this for the rest of my life.

Keeping myself well enough was never a priority, you’ve got a lot of international travel and you’re in hotels and strange places. You’re not eating properly there’s no toilets.

My wife took control of my health because I was totally incapable of managing it. However, that didn’t stop me from being in a hotel in Asia and getting antibiotics injected into me at midnight because I had a pre-dawn start the next morning.

You make some very bad decisions about your health when you’re under that sort of pressure."

Dick Marks OAM

Dick Marks OAM, Film Director, Production Company owner.

"There is a saying, life’s short play hard.

I wish someone had of said to me every morning, (because I now say to other people), life is not short, it’s actually quiet long, and you have to play smart.

I’ve seen so many meteoric film makers who light up the sky for 5 or 10 years and then they're gone. Burnt out. They don’t pace themselves. They don’t change styles when they should. They don’t move with the times. They don’t follow technology.

Arrogance is the big killer, if you become arrogant about what you do, there’s a fair chance you’re going to miss the next wave."

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